Three S&T faculty helped strike down claims that “juiced” baseballs were the cause of a spike in Major League home run hits in 1987. Dr. Lee Bain and Dr. V.A. Samaranayake in mathematics and statistics, along with Dr. Terry Lenhoff in mechanical engineering, were hired as independent testers. Bain and Lenhoff brought to the project more than a dozen years of testing baseballs for the National and American Leagues and several manufacturers to ensure rigid specifications were met. The team’s testing methods included “pitching” baseballs with a cannon as well as taking measurements and conducting statistical analysis.

Their findings? There was no foul play. The baseballs all met major-league standards. When juicing speculation resurfaced in 1994, the S&T research was cited in USA Today, causing one writer to call the rumors “ball-oney.”

Now that’s a win for the home team!

Share This Story

Spark a Memory?

Share your story! Fill out the form below to share your fondest memory or anecdote of S&T. If you'd prefer not typing, you can also share by phone at 833-646-3715 (833-Miner150).

Behind every weather forecast

Behind every weather forecast

The next time you’re watching the Weather Channel, you might want to thank S&T alumnus Harry Smith for equipping today’s…

Wharton makes KC Chiefs’ roster

Wharton makes KC Chiefs’ roster

Former Missouri S&T defensive lineman Tershawn Wharton, who earned All-America honors while a Miner, made the 2020 opening day roster…

From Miners to olympians

From Miners to olympians

Two alumni have worked their way into the Olympics through hard work and determination. Tyrone Smith and Shawn Wallace both…

Fruit juice helps send children to school

Fruit juice helps send children to school

Boonchai Songthumvat, MS EMgt’76, and his food scientist wife, Nuchanart, started Nuboon Co. in 1992 to manufacture fruit and vegetable…

Creating fashion for feet

Creating fashion for feet

When Darla Ellis, a 2006 graduate in chemical engineering, began a summer internship with Nike, Inc. during her senior year…

From uranium to wine

From uranium to wine

Richard K. Vitek, a 1958 chemistry graduate, began his career as a research chemist producing uranium from ore, before moving…