Taking S&T to dizzying heights

The snows of Kilimanjaro have been touched by Missouri S&T. Sarah Taylor, a 2001 graduate in electrical engineering, and her father, Mark Amen, who earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering in 1976, climbed to the summit of Africa’s highest peak and planted the S&T flag in March 2011. It’s quite a feat, considering that Kilimanjaro is the highest free-standing mountain (not part of a range) in the world at 19,340 feet. Sarah and Mark summited at Uhuru Peak, the highest point on Kibo’s volcanic rim.

Share This Story

Spark a Memory?

Share your story! Fill out the form below to share your fondest memory or anecdote of S&T. If you'd prefer not typing, you can also share by phone at 833-646-3715 (833-Miner150).

Savannah (Signaigo) and Nathan Leezer

Savannah (Signaigo) and Nathan Leezer

Savannah (Signaigo) and Nathan Leezer met during Greek Week activities in September 2010 when Nathan, a first-year Interfraternity Council representative,…

NIH’s first woman scientist

NIH’s first woman scientist

Dr. Ida Bengston was the first woman the National Institutes of Health (NIH) hired as a scientist in 1916. For…

Rebuilding a flooded town

Rebuilding a flooded town

At its happening, the Flood of ‘93 was one of the worst crises to have ever impacted the St. Louis…

Four months away from Earth

Four months away from Earth

Sandra “Sandy” Magnus has been part of three space flights and spent more than four months in space during her…

Surveying the future of mining

Surveying the future of mining

Karl F. Hasselmann, who graduated in 1925 with a degree in mining engineering, was oil prospecting in Europe when he…

Cheryl B. Schrader on strategic planning

Cheryl B. Schrader on strategic planning

Cheryl B. Schrader, who served as chancellor between 2012 and 2017, describes her approach to strategic...