Taking S&T to dizzying heights

The snows of Kilimanjaro have been touched by Missouri S&T. Sarah Taylor, a 2001 graduate in electrical engineering, and her father, Mark Amen, who earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering in 1976, climbed to the summit of Africa’s highest peak and planted the S&T flag in March 2011. It’s quite a feat, considering that Kilimanjaro is the highest free-standing mountain (not part of a range) in the world at 19,340 feet. Sarah and Mark summited at Uhuru Peak, the highest point on Kibo’s volcanic rim.

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