Tamiko Youngblood, MinE’92, MS EMgt’94, PhD EMgt’97, was a woman of many “firsts.” She was the first African American woman to graduate from Missouri S&T’s mining engineering program and she was the first African American woman to earn a Ph.D. from S&T. In addition to a bachelor’s degree in mining engineering (1992), she also earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. in engineering management in 1994 and 1997, respectively. 

Youngblood was an associate professor of engineering at Robert Morris University at the time of her death in 2015. While at RMU, she served as a faculty advisor to the student chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers. 

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