Harry Smith earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from S&T in 1942.
Harry Smith earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from S&T in 1942.

The next time you’re watching the Weather Channel, you might want to thank S&T alumnus Harry Smith for equipping today’s weather forecasters with more accurate weather-tracking methods.

Smith earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from S&T in 1942. As an engineer at Westinghouse in the 1950s, he worked to improve existing radar techniques to better detect planes. His work led to pulse-Doppler radar. Doppler radar is commonly used today for weather surveillance because it allows forecasters to detect the motion of precipitation and a storm’s intensity.

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