Titanoboa – reptile king of the prehistoric rainforest

Sixty million years ago in the steamy prehistoric forests of what is now Colombia, there slithered a 50-foot, 2,500-pound reptile. Its bones were found in an open coal pit in 2006. Carlos Jaramillo thought at first he and his team had found fossils from an ancient crocodile. But no. It was a snake. Jaramillo and his co-researchers published their findings in the journal Nature in February 2009 and named the reptile Titanoboa. The paleontologist earned a master’s degree in geology and geophysics from S&T in 1995.

Share This Story

Spark a Memory?

Share your story! Fill out the form below to share your fondest memory or anecdote of S&T. If you'd prefer not typing, you can also share by phone at 833-646-3715 (833-Miner150).

Taking S&T to dizzying heights

Taking S&T to dizzying heights

The snows of Kilimanjaro have been touched by Missouri S&T. Sarah Taylor, a 2001 graduate in electrical engineering, and her…

Advice for tomorrow’s leaders

Advice for tomorrow’s leaders

Louis Smith, EE’66, president of AlliedSignal Inc., gave the commencement address to the graduating class in the spring 1993. The…

Erin Hayden and Matthew Garger

Erin Hayden and Matthew Garger

Although Erin Hayden and Matthew Garger were both students at S&T for an overlapping year, they didn’t meet until the…

The fine art of tuning a Corvette

The fine art of tuning a Corvette

Charlie Rusher, a 2011 graduate in mechanical engineering, “makes Corvettes sound like Corvettes.” Rusher was interviewed by The New York…

From banker to ‘Bachelor’

From banker to ‘Bachelor’

Aaron Buerge, a 1997 mechanical engineering graduate and president of the First National Bank in Springfield, Missouri, was the focus…

Sandy (Junge) and Brian Klein

Sandy (Junge) and Brian Klein

Sandy (Junge) and Brian Klein met in 1990 during lunch in the TJ Hall cafeteria. “Sandy needed a typewriter to…