Emily Hernandez, who earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 2016, began recruiting minorities to STEM fields even before she started college. She started in eighth grade during a camp called Girls Experiencing Engineering near her hometown of Germantown, Tennessee.

Today, Hernandez works at CelLink in San Carlos, California, where she designs and builds flexible circuits for high-speed applications. She says she’s fascinated by hardware design, signal integrity and power electronics in addition to their evolution as technology continues to advance.

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