Endurance was her middle name

Eva Hirdler Greene earned a general science degree – because the faculty refused to award her a mining engineering degree.
Eva Hirdler Greene earned a general science degree – because the faculty refused to award her a mining engineering degree.

The first woman to earn a degree from S&T, Eva Endurance Hirdler Greene, class of 1911, received the general science degree – even though she had completed the coursework to be a mining engineer. Her peers recognized her accomplishment, granting her status as a Knight of St. Patrick, but the faculty refused. She went on to a distinguished career in mining reconnaissance and oil production before shifting her focus to industrial management. In 1972, the faculty voted to grant her the mining degree she so richly deserved. Her endurance paid off.

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