Dr. Clyde Cowan, ChemE’40, was posthumously recognized for his part in research that earned the 1995 Nobel Prize in physics. Cowan was a co-discoverer of the neutrino, along with prize winner Dr. Frederick Reines. In 1956, the two researchers discovered the nearly massless subatomic particles called neutrinos. But the role neutrinos served was still unconfirmed until recent research, which found that they play a role in the formation of galaxies by suppressing clustering of dark matter. Dr. Shun Saito, an assistant professor of physics at S&T, was part of a team that found that neutrino-rich regions are strongly correlated with massive galaxy clusters.

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