As the clock ticked down to the year 2000, computer scientists around the world were fretting about the so-called “Y2K bug,” which many feared would wreak havoc on our heavily computerized society. In the late 1990s, a computer program created by Rex Widmer, a computer science graduate in 1972, put many minds at ease. Widmer’s Portfolio Analyzer could quickly and efficiently locate lines of code that needed to be changed before the clock struck midnight on Jan. 1, 2000. The program could “munch through 100,000 programs – perhaps millions of lines of code – in a day,” he said in a 1998 interview. Unfortunately, Widmer never lived to see the success of his software. He died in a car accident in January 1999 while returning home to Shawnee Mission, Kansas, from a campus visit.

Share This Story

Spark a Memory?

Share your story! Fill out the form below to share your fondest memory or anecdote of S&T. If you'd prefer not typing, you can also share by phone at 833-646-3715 (833-Miner150).

Using glass to treat cancer

Using glass to treat cancer

An expert in developing specialty glasses for use in health care, transportation infrastructure and other applications, Delbert Day is known…

Tom Benton’s ‘Missouri,’ from mural to movie

Tom Benton’s ‘Missouri,’ from mural to movie

It was “over a few root beer floats” one night that James Bogan and Frank Fillo decided to make a…

Hall of fame astronaut

Hall of fame astronaut

Janet Kavandi, former deputy director at NASA’s Glenn Research Center and a NASA astronaut, has logged more than 33 days…

Supporting female faculty at S&T

Supporting female faculty at S&T

When she established the Woman of the Year award at Missouri S&T, Cindy Tang, a 1985 economics graduate, wanted to…

Bringing water to those in need

Bringing water to those in need

As co-founder of Water.org, Gary White has helped empower more than 29 million people worldwide with access to safe water…

The sun’s on their side

The sun’s on their side

In 1999, the Missouri S&T Solar Car Team took first place in Sunrayce, now known as the American Solar Challenge….