The sun’s on their side

In 1999, the Missouri S&T Solar Car Team took first place in Sunrayce, now known as the American Solar Challenge. The course started in Washington, D.C., and ended in Orlando, Florida, and stands out in the record books due to the lack of sunshine. Solar Miner II completed the race in just over 56 hours and averaged 25.3 miles per hour.

The first American Solar Challenge race was organized and sponsored by General Motors in 1990 to promote automotive engineering and solar energy among college students. At the time, GM had just won the inaugural World Solar Challenge in Australia in 1987 and they chose to sponsor collegiate events instead of continuing to race.

The Missouri S&T Solar Car Team also won first place at the American Solar Challenge in 2003. Solar Miner IV completed the course in a little over 50 hours. 

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